The Uncommon Man

February 11, 2009

THE BIGGEST FATHERHOOD RALLY OF THE DECADE!!!!!!!


"A NATIONAL RALLY FOR RESPONSIBLE FATHERHOOD ON BEHALF OF AMERICA'S CHILDREN: A CALL TO PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY"

WHY A RESPONSIBLE FATHERHOOD RALLY?

In honor of the 100 Year Anniversary of Father's Day holiday in America, NPCL and other partner organizations have set out to make history. The plight of Fatherhood in America is at an all-time low, and millions of children across the country are suffering from shallow or non-existing relationships with their Fathers. On June 20th, 2009, Father's across the country will take a stand together for the future parents of America: OUR KIDS.

This summer, Father's across the nation will convene at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC prepared to take an oath of dedication to their children and families to be RESPONSIBLE. In the words of Fatherhood expert, Dr. Jeffery M. Johnson, "When you are a Father, you are a Father for LIFE." Transcending stereotypes, past mistakes and present fears, NPCL, Guest Speakers and Dad's across the nation strive to encourage responsible fatherhood throughout the U.S. in a powerful and unforgettable way!

LINCOLN MEMORIAL in Washington, DC

The Date is Available! However, an official confirmation that the event will be held at the Lincoln will not be made known until March 2, 2009. Check back with this site in March for a listing of Rally Chairs and Co-Chairs in your state!

HOST A LOCAL RALLY IN YOUR STATE ON JUNE 20, 2009

The Lincoln Memorial in Washington is the pending location for the National Repsonsible Fatherhood Rally. However, not all who strive to attend will be able to travel to DC for this event. In states across the country, community members and Fatherhood organizations will convene to host a Local Fatherhood Rally within their state. Check back with this site in March 2009 for a listing of Rally Chairs and Co-Chairs in your state!

For more information, visit: http://www.npclstrongfamilies.com/New_Images___Text_Layout_5.html

Posted by Aaron Buford at 09:49 AM | Comments (0)

February 04, 2009

A Call To Men: 4th Annual National Conference

A Call To Men
Stand Up - Speak Out!
4th Annual National Conference
May 21 - 22, 2009
New York City
http://www.acalltomen.org

This event will be an unprecedented gathering of men and women coming together for the purpose of increasing our knowledge while strategizing and organizing to end violence against women in our communities. We are excited and honored to have you join us in this collective effort to Stand Up and Speak Out to end domestic violence, sexual violence and all forms of violence and discrimination against women and girls.

Full Brochure
http://www.acalltomen.org/downloads/STAND%20UP%20SPEAK%20OUT.pdf

http://www.acalltomen.org

Posted by Daniel at 03:08 PM | Comments (0)

January 26, 2009

New Responsible Men Blog

Ted Rutherford of Responsible Men has launched a new blog to discuss issues surrounding oppression - in particular sexual and domestic violence.

Visit: http://responsiblemen.wordpress.com

To learn more about Responsible Men, visit their main website at: www.responsiblemen.net

Posted by Daniel at 05:01 PM | Comments (0)

December 22, 2008

Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India: Proving What Works in Engaging Men

It is obvious that engaging men is vital to ending violence against women. But what works best to get them involved? What persuades them to change their attitudes? Will they change their actual behaviours? Providing answers to these questions would be invaluable to the growing number of anti-violence initiatives for men that are springing up around the world. A UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women project involving organizations in Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India is setting out to do just that.

“There is an impressive body of experiences in working with men, but also uneven evidence on and some skepticism about what the impacts actually are,” says Christine Ricardo at Brazil-based Instituto Promundo, the project’s lead organization. “Our hope is to contribute to the global evidence base on what can be done by developing evaluation models to guide future programming and advocacy.”

In each country, project partners will carry out rigorous impact evaluation studies of group workshops and campaigns targeting men between the ages of 15 and 40 in low-income communities. The workshops will engage up to 3,000 participants; the campaigns are expected to reach an additional 20,000 men. Each intervention will be tailored to the individual country, and designed to explore issues such as traditional notions of masculinity, promote alternatives to violence, and encourage positive changes in attitudes and behaviours. One particular model that the project will draw on is Program H, a Promundo initiative to involve men in supporting gender equality that has been successfully rolled out in 20 countries in Asia, Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

Through follow-up surveys that tap both men and their partners, immediately and over time, the project will scrutinize actual changes in attitudes and behaviors, and the factors that foster or hinder these. Project partners are aiming for increases in positive attitudes and behaviours among men, decreases in the self-reported use of violence and greater awareness of the importance of engaging men. Lessons learned will be disseminated through the MenEngage Alliance, a global network of more than 400 organizations.

Each of the participating countries has a demonstrated commitment to working to end violence against women. Brazil and India, in particular, exert the kind of regional influence that could encourage neighbouring countries to pick up on project results. Chile and Rwanda are expected to further develop existing capacities to work with men and conduct evaluations, with a particular emphasis on post-conflict needs in Rwanda.

Ricardo stresses that across the project, there will be attempts to differentiate what is universal, and what needs to be culturally specific. She adds, “the backing of the UN Trust Fund is very powerful in getting the results out and recognized. It has so much credibility, and offers so many possibilities for exchange and collaborative learning.”

Instituto Promundo, Brazil, received a grant in 2008 from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women for the 3-year project titled “Engaging Men to End Gender-Based Violence: A Multi-Country Intervention and Impact Evaluation Study,” which it is conducting in partnership with CulturaSalud/EME (Chile), the International Center for Research on Women (United States and India), Men’s Resources International (United States), the Rwanda Men’s Resource Centre and Rwanda MenEngage Network (Rwanda), and Sahayog (India). For more information, please contact UN Trust Fund staff.

Posted by Aaron Buford at 03:06 PM | Comments (0)

Men Can Stop Rape Conference: Men and Women as Allies

Men Can Stop Rape, Inc. is pleased to invite you to join us at our conference, "Men and Women as Allies: National Conference on Primary Prevention of Violence Against Women."

For more information, visit:
http://mencanstoprape.org/conference/

This conference will take place this April 14-15, 2009 at the deluxe Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

As we enter a time of change, it is an opportune moment to engage the new administration. You will hear keynotes from new appointees and participate in federal briefings.

We also believe it is time for a new conversation about prevention of violence against women based on some tough, hard questions. What are women's and men's roles in primary prevention? How can domestic violence, sexual assault, and men's anti-violence groups work together to advance prevention?

We will meet these and other challenging questions head on, seeking informed and constructive answers.

Your participation will help to create a conference climate that is inspirational, motivational, and collaborative.

We look forward to seeing you in April!

Sincerely,

Stephen Glaude
President and CEO

http://mencanstoprape.org/conference/

Posted by Daniel at 02:04 PM | Comments (0)

Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India: Proving What Works in Engaging Men

It is obvious that engaging men is vital to ending violence against women. But what works best to get them involved? What persuades them to change their attitudes? Will they change their actual behaviours? Providing answers to these questions would be invaluable to the growing number of anti-violence initiatives for men that are springing up around the world. A UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women project involving organizations in Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India is setting out to do just that.

“There is an impressive body of experiences in working with men, but also uneven evidence on and some skepticism about what the impacts actually are,” says Christine Ricardo at Brazil-based Instituto Promundo, the project’s lead organization. “Our hope is to contribute to the global evidence base on what can be done by developing evaluation models to guide future programming and advocacy.”

In each country, project partners will carry out rigorous impact evaluation studies of group workshops and campaigns targeting men between the ages of 15 and 40 in low-income communities. The workshops will engage up to 3,000 participants; the campaigns are expected to reach an additional 20,000 men. Each intervention will be tailored to the individual country, and designed to explore issues such as traditional notions of masculinity, promote alternatives to violence, and encourage positive changes in attitudes and behaviours. One particular model that the project will draw on is Program H, a Promundo initiative to involve men in supporting gender equality that has been successfully rolled out in 20 countries in Asia, Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

Through follow-up surveys that tap both men and their partners, immediately and over time, the project will scrutinize actual changes in attitudes and behaviors, and the factors that foster or hinder these. Project partners are aiming for increases in positive attitudes and behaviours among men, decreases in the self-reported use of violence and greater awareness of the importance of engaging men. Lessons learned will be disseminated through the MenEngage Alliance, a global network of more than 400 organizations.

Each of the participating countries has a demonstrated commitment to working to end violence against women. Brazil and India, in particular, exert the kind of regional influence that could encourage neighbouring countries to pick up on project results. Chile and Rwanda are expected to further develop existing capacities to work with men and conduct evaluations, with a particular emphasis on post-conflict needs in Rwanda.

Ricardo stresses that across the project, there will be attempts to differentiate what is universal, and what needs to be culturally specific. She adds, “the backing of the UN Trust Fund is very powerful in getting the results out and recognized. It has so much credibility, and offers so many possibilities for exchange and collaborative learning.”

Instituto Promundo, Brazil, received a grant in 2008 from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women for the 3-year project titled “Engaging Men to End Gender-Based Violence: A Multi-Country Intervention and Impact Evaluation Study,” which it is conducting in partnership with CulturaSalud/EME (Chile), the International Center for Research on Women (United States and India), Men’s Resources International (United States), the Rwanda Men’s Resource Centre and Rwanda MenEngage Network (Rwanda), and Sahayog (India). For more information, please contact UN Trust Fund staff.

Posted by Aaron Buford at 01:28 PM | Comments (0)

April 02, 2008

Men's Resource Center for Change Seeks Executive Director

The Men's Resource Center for Change, for more than 25 years, has supported men, challenged men's violence, and nurtured men's leadership by providing support programs and domestic violence intervention service programs. MRC has been a significant voice through its publications and outreach programs for redefining masculinity in both a regional and national context.

We seek an inspired and strategic executive director who will oversee programs, expand funding sources, develop innovative collaborations, and articulate our message of supporting men, challenging violence, and redefining masculinity. The executive director will strengthen the efforts of a skilled and dedicated team already engaged in this work-staff, board and volunteers. Reporting to the Board of Directors, the executive director will oversee programs, operations and fiscal management, which includes development and management of grants and fundraising. Our administrative office is located in downtown Amherst, MA, with programs operating in four Western Massachusetts counties.

The ideal candidate will have:

* Commitment to constructing new notions of masculinity that foster healthy and safe relationships and empower men to challenge violence, oppose homophobia, and seek a more just and peaceful society

* Experience in fundraising from individual donors, public and governmental agencies, foundations and corporations

* Proven track record in identifying new funding sources, grant writing and grant management

* Experience in marketing programs to new constituencies and developing programs that meet the needs of diverse communities

* Excellent communication skills in articulating organizational vision to media, community agencies and public officials

* Experience in senior management, including program development and financial management

* Experience supervising and evaluating staff and helping build competencies

* Ability to work in collaboration with a board of directors, to inspire and help focus board energies and further board development

* Experience with collaborative decision making, fostering consensus in a non-hierarchical organizational culture

Compensation commensurate with experience.

Applications may be submitted electronically or by mail. Send letter and resume to allan.arnaboldi@mrcforchange.com or to Allan Arnaboldi, Men's Resource Center, 236 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Ideal start date for new position is between June 15 and July 1, 2008.

Posted by Daniel at 03:30 PM | Comments (0)

September 20, 2007

U.Va. Men Teaching Local Boys: M is for Many Ways of Being Masculine

From the University of Virginia publication, UVa Today, submitted by Claire N. Kaplan.

"My father, brother, grandfather and uncles taught me culture, pride, a sense of moral conduct."

"My father taught me a man can fill most any role and do it in his own style."

"Violence has a negative impact on men's lives, as well as women's."

These comments come from members of a new men's group formed at the University of Virginia, the Men's Leadership Project. Its mission: to pair undergraduates with local fifth-grade boys and offer them a different kind of mentoring based upon openness about what it means to be a man. Its chief goal is to reduce violent behavior toward women.

Men who are activists for preventing violence against women say the problem needs to be addressed on several different levels of society and culture, said Claire Kaplan, director of the U.Va. Women's Center's Sexual and Domestic Violence Services, where the program is housed.

The Men's Leadership Project is a program just for guys. Christopher Wilcox Elliott, who works part-time in the Dean of Students Office in Fraternity and Sorority Life, is leading the new effort to offer alternative role models to the ones displayed in the media and other places.

"We don't say we have answers," Wilcox Elliott said, "but we show there is a wide range of ways to be a man." He wants to build upon the success of other kinds of mentoring programs by adding social change to the importance of community.

The program, which also includes a for-credit course, will give young males a chance to talk about what it means to be a boy or man and to be themselves as individuals, how and where they learn about being male and how that relates to how they feel and act. The program will give the college men an opportunity to take leadership roles and show the boys how to focus on gender awareness and how to be comfortable about it around other males.

"Gender identity refers to how you perceive and express yourself in masculine and feminine terms," Wilcox Elliot said.

"Boys and men rarely get to talk about gender," Kaplan said.

"Why is violence considered normative for men? It has a negative impact on men's lives, as well as women's," added Wilcox Elliott, who joined his first men's group in college, working on sexual assault and violence prevention.

The program won't be focusing on sexual violence prevention in the context of dating relationships -- the fifth-graders aren't old enough to talk about that, Kaplan noted. But they are old enough to think critically.

"Crime and violence are gendered. They're all about claiming power and status by aggressive means," Wilcox Elliott said. Furthermore, the idea of what it means to be a man so often looks like a twisted depiction of hyper-masculinity these days, he said.

Wilcox Elliott, a doctoral student in the Curry School of Education's social foundations program, said the program will explore more of the positive aspects of masculinity, including ideas about being a good friend, a good partner, being responsible for your actions, supporting and valuing family, and other ways of earning respect.

Education professor Peter Sheras, a clinical psychologist in the Curry School who specializes in working with teenagers, said, "Being a young adolescent boy can be very difficult. Many boys lack appropriate models for how to interact with the world around them. It is in the nature of their developmental agendas, however, that they need not just models, but support as well. This project can provide [that] support and also teach older adolescents and young adults how to mentor and lead in their world."

"I hope these sorts of mentoring and support approaches become contagious in our society," said Sheras, the author of several books, including Your Child: Bully or Victim?

With the help of the Michael Mason, a guidance counselor at Walker Upper Elementary School, the project has also received the support of parents, who will meet with the group several times this year.

The first cohort of 13 undergraduates in the Men's Leadership Project went through a semester-long training last spring. Elliott said he watched them become more open, honest and critical over their time together.

"Learning about the variety of other influences on our identity and how to incorporate those into a sense of self has been challenging and hugely rewarding," said one of the students, Patrick Cronin, who lives on the Lawn and is president of One in Four, a college men's group focused on preventing and responding to sexual assault.

Third-year student Carlos Oronce said one of the most significant things he has learned about being a man is that gender is omnipresent and requires constant consideration.

"That is, we should be respectful, be polite, and take care of the ones whom we care about, but that does not entitle us (men) to assume a general sense of ignorant benevolence or feelings of superiority, whether or not they are intended," said Oronce, a biochemistry major and president of the Asian Student Union.

Being part of a large extended family has provided Oronce with several role models, he said.

"My male identity was shaped significantly by my father, brother, grandfather and uncles. They all provided me fundamental lessons on the numerous relationships we have -- father and son, uncle and nephew, or brother and older brother -- how to act in these relationships and how to interact with others. They taught me culture, pride, a sense of moral conduct."

Cronin, a fourth-year double major in economics and African-American and African Studies, had a different experience. During his high school years, his father retired and stayed home to take care of the household and three boys while his mother worked in the traditionally male occupation of financial services.

"His example for those years left an indelible mark on how I define manhood," said Cronin.

At the same time, he said he learned being a man is to challenge oneself.

"My father taught me not to fear failure, but to fear not trying. Understanding that a man can fill most any role and do it in his own style was important for me as a teenager," Cronin said. "It is a lesson I hope my little brother learns over the course of his life, and I want to be a part of that learning."

The U.Va. mentors are not just founding members of the Men's Leadership Project. They are students in Wilcox Elliott's class, "Leadership Development and Mentoring with Adolescent Boys," an education course with a service-learning component. In the University's tradition of student self-governance, students contribute to the course content and facilitate group sessions. They are conducting pre- and post-surveys with the boys. Together with Wilcox Elliott, they evaluate how the program is going week by week.

If the program is successful and expands, they hope to open it to all boys, Kaplan said, "because all boys are at risk for violence whether they are privileged or not."

Ten years ago, the Women's Center created a similar program for girls, the Young Women Leaders Program, that has been highly successful.

Posted by Jorge at 04:33 PM | Comments (0)

September 14, 2007

Newly-Enhanced Prevention & Education Areas

VAWnet has significantly enhanced the content, structure, and utility of the Prevention & Education information on our website. These special collections of selected materials on prevention theory, models, and approaches for raising awareness and increasing community engagement to end violence against women are now located within the Domestic Violence and Sexual Violence areas of VAWnet. The materials included provide a broad range of information and tools to support advocates' prevention and education efforts.

Access the enhanced areas at: http://www.VAWnet.org/

FEATURES INCLUDE:

  • Prevention: This area features theories and practices that promote the prevention of domestic and sexual violence. Prevention approaches are designated as primary, secondary, and/or tertiary in nature, and "model" or "promising" programs, curricula, and initiatives are identified. Evaluation materials are provided to help guide evidence-based, cost-effective prevention efforts. Subsections include: Theory & Research, Practice, and Evaluation.
  • Education: This area includes strategies for raising awareness and
    increasing community engagement to end domestic and sexual violence.
    Specific campaigns and initiatives are identified, in addition to
    outreach strategies and materials for training individuals to
    identify, prevent, and respond to violence against women in various
    settings. Several kits and tools are provided. Subsections include:
    Raising Awareness & Increasing Engagement: Campaigns & Initiatives,
    Training, Outreach, and Kits & Tools.
  • DVAM/SAAM: This section provides access to the National Domestic
    Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) and Sexual Assault Awareness Month
    (SAAM) websites, offering a variety of resources including campaign
    ideas and materials, activities and resources, and calendars of local
    events.

Direct links:

As always, we welcome your feedback and suggestions!

Casey Keene
VAWnet Resource Coordinator
ck@pcadv.org

Posted by Jorge at 02:01 PM | Comments (0)

April 27, 2007

MRC of South Texas Marches Against Sexual Violence

Dear Friends,

Greetings from the Men's Resource Center of South Texas! I hope this post finds you well! Last night the MRC STX held it's annual Community March Against Sexual Violence and it was a great success -- men, women, children and the local Batterers Intervention Prevention Program participants marched with us. This is the first year that the local newspaper, the Valley Morning Star covered our Sexual Assault Awareness event. Here is the link to the article by Amanda Harris: United Against Violence. Thanks to all those who marched and spoke during the rally: Lina Suarez, Frank Bauer, and Rogelio Nunez. Please forward the article to everyone in your life and thank you for your on-going support!

Paz,
Emiliano Diaz de Leon

Executive Director, Men's Resource Center of South Texas
mrcofsouthtexas@yahoo.com | www.mrcofsouthtexas.org

"We support men's journeys as they challenge violence and oppression."

Posted by Daniel at 11:46 AM | Comments (0)

January 10, 2007

Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality (JMMS)

Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality (JMMS) is a new online, scholarly, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal. The first issue is now available on an open access basis.

JMMS seeks to be as inclusive as possible in its area of enquiry. Papers address the full spectrum of masculinities and sexualities, particularly those which are seldom heard. Similarly, JMMS addresses not only monotheistic religions and spiritualities but also Eastern, indigenous, new religious movements and other spiritualities which resist categorization. JMMS papers address historical and contemporary phenomena as well as speculative essays about future spiritualities.

Please refer to the website for further information: http://www.jmmsweb.org

Managing Editor, Joseph Gelfer, gives a nice introduction in the first issue.

Posted by Daniel at 02:46 PM | Comments (0)

November 29, 2006

Greetings from The Men’s Network of the Zambian YWCA

The Men’s Network of the Zambian YWCA (YZMN) joins the world in celebrating the Sixteen Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence (GBV) that is held from the 25th day of November to the 10th day of December every year. We identify with this year’s theme “Advance Human Rights-End Gender Based Violence” in reaching out to you. The YZMN is committed to eradicating GBV in order to create a world that embraces gender equality and equity as social norms.

The YZMN directly involves and targets the male child, male youth and adult males in forming a Network that will fight GBV and promote human rights. For three (3) years now, YZMN has educated and advocated for healthy and better communities that will enhance peace, equality and development. The YZMN’s message to you is:

“Just like Leprosy, Small Pox, and Polio, Gender Based Violence is bound for extinction. United, we are strong”

Greetings from The Men’s Network of the Zambian YWCA and Zambia

Posted by Daniel at 10:33 AM | Comments (0)

September 20, 2006

In support of International Men's Day

Following is a description of International Men's Day sent to us with an invitation to participate from our colleagues in Trinidad & Tobago -- specifically, Dr. Jerome Teelucksingh. As you can see, this annual observance has admirable goals and has created some positive momentum in the communities involved.

The theme for this year is “A World Without Prostitution and pornography”. It includes a focus on the effects of prostitution and pornography on the individual and family life. Some topics for discussion: Is it possible to ever eradicate prostitution and pornography? Do individuals who view porn experience psychological and emotional problems? Is the media assisting the porn and prostitution
industries?

---------------------------------------- INTERNATIONAL MEN'S DAY 19th November

The objectives of celebrating an International Men’s Day include improving gender relations, promoting gender equality, producing responsible males and highlighting positive role models.

The annual observance of International Men's Day on November 19th seeks to address problems and challenges facing men. These issues include the involvement of men in domestic violence, drug abuse, fathering, homicides, sports, media, power, sexuality, politics, religion, parenting, war, suicides and family life.

Some of the goals of Men’s Day – to promote unity, resolve disputes, cultivate greater understanding between men and women, increase tolerance and thus create a safer, better world.

This special day for men was initiated in November 1999 and received an overwhelming response from men's groups in North America, the Caribbean, Asia, Africa and Europe. In public forums, discussion groups and conferences, attempts were made to address and seek
solutions for the problems facing males in today's society.

Individuals, international associations, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and religious bodies have been contacted to assist in the observance of this special day.

There is also a need for the regular hosting of international conferences on men to address issues and seek solutions.

Hopefully, in the long-term we can make International Men's Day on November 19th an annual worldwide event with beneficial results. It is hoped that men interested in improving themselves and reforming other males would be part of this ongoing "Men's Revolution" and annually celebrate International Men's Day.

At work, in our communities, schools and religious institutions, there should be dialogue between both sexes for greater understanding and tolerance. Thanks for your support and advice in this endeavour as we strive for gender equality and attempt to remove the negative images and the stigma associated with men in our society.


Posted by Daniel at 10:44 AM | Comments (0)

July 31, 2006

Native American Men's Code of Conduct

I wanted to share a wonderful Men’s Code of Conduct that was developed during a Native American Summit on Gender, Family, and Community Violence, held Oct. 12-13, 2005. This came to my attention via some postings on our listserve from Cliff Moore, Director of Washington State University Thurston County Extension, who worked on the summit’s planning committee, chaired, the Men’s Institute committee, and developed the Code with the participants.

Men's Institute Code Of Conduct

• I recognize that silence is not acceptable and that words alone are not enough, I must act.

• I will put my family first; before friends, community and even self. I will love, protect and provide for my family.

• I will model love and tenderness for my children, spouse/ partner, parents and community.

• I will work to make my home a place of safety and security for my family - A Sanctuary.

• I will be a positive role model for my own family, children and community.

• I commit to showing and sharing my emotions and feelings openly and honestly.

• I will acknowledge my own mistakes and learn from them.

• I am willing to say "I'm sorry" when I make a mistake; and I will show through my actions that I mean it.

• I am willing to learn, change and grow.

• I will act in a manner that is respectful of myself and others.

• I will celebrate my own history and culture, as well as those of others.

• I will be accountable for unearned male privilege and strive for gender equality and equity.

• I recognize that domestic violence is a community issue, affecting everyone, including men and generations to come.

• I will support the development of education across cultures regarding domestic violence as it relates to contemporary societal norms and laws.

• I will support community organizations that provide assistance to families, victims and perpetrators.

• I will help deliver the message that violence is never an appropriate means of communication or problem solving.

• I refuse to abuse.

With a spirit of love and hope, I affirm that I will live by this code, and that I will encourage others to adopt it as well.

Posted by Daniel at 11:32 AM | Comments (1)

July 25, 2006

Movement of Men against AIDS in Kenya (MMAAK)

MRI has recenty been in touch with Movement Of Men Against Aids in Kenya (MMAAK). This is a committed and courageous organization that shares many goals and values with MRI.

Following is some infomration from their Web site:

The Movement of Men against AIDS in Kenya (MMAAK) is a Non Governmental Organization supporting men infected and affected by HIV/AIDS in Kenya. The idea of the movement come about as the need of engaging more men in HIV/AID programmers was identified in 1999. HIV/AIDS was then declared a National disaster by the then president Daniel Arap Moi in Mombasa, MMAAK wanted to support Men for them to Make a Difference.

Values
Our values are based on the realization that Men MUST be involved, and contribute in the fight against HIV/AID: they must take the lead role: must assume the responsibility.

Vision
To strive to build a society in which men infected and affected with HIV/AID, engang and greatly participate in Prevention, Care and Support for an AIDS free Kenya.

Mission Statement
To involve all men from all segment of life in society in the greater participation in HIV Prevention, trough Mobilization, formation of Networks and Strategic alliances, Capacity strengthening, provision of information for behavioral change and provision of care and support for men infected and affected while striving to challenge social and cultural stereo types hinder progress in the fight against HIV/AID.

Posted by Daniel at 03:04 PM | Comments (0)

April 03, 2006

Pro-Feminist Men's Mentors

My regular "link-person", Hugo Schwyzer, has a response to the post I made last week at Dark Daughta. Here Hugo makes a great case for the need for pro-feminist men to have male pro-feminist men as mentors, while at the same time having feminist women helping to guide one's way. In particular, I like that Hugo is drawing a distinction between having women "mother" a man, and the need for anyone who is looking to be an ally and to confront their own privileged behavior to be "gently" challenged.

via Hugo Schwyzer - "An issue of mentorship" --a thought or two about pro-feminist men and their feminist mentors

Posted by Russell at 10:35 AM | Comments (0)

March 20, 2006

Pro-Feminist Men: Reach Out And Comment

Last week I posted a link to a piece on Official Shrub about the amount of Men's Rights men commenting on feminist sites. Well, Tekanji from Official Shrub posted a comment to that piece. I've decided, since the comments sections on this site are not fully utilized, to highlight her comment as a post. Part of her comment excerpted below is regarding which kind of men post to feminist sites:

Ultimately, I think the problem is less the misogynists (because, for all that they can get particularly nasty, they are an extremist minority) and more unexamined privilege. It's the guys who mean well, but don't have the tools (or the drive) to actually translate their intentions into a reality. Because, I mean, they aren't a misogynist, so what are we women complaining about?

I want to encourage all of the pro-feminist men who visit this site to visit some of the other pro-feminist sites and post a comment to an entry that interests you. You can link to some of the sites through the "Links" section on the right. Visit these sites regularly and comment often....

Posted by Russell at 12:29 PM | Comments (1)

March 17, 2006

Pro-Feminist Men, Not Masculine?

Favorite blogger, Hugo Schwyzer, reflects on some of the posts in a comments section where Men's Rights Actists question Hugo's masculinity. He considers how this is a standard tactic:

As I've written before, most criticism of pro-feminist men (those of us who ask men to make radical changes in their lives) falls into one of the three categories:

1. We're all gay, and thus not "real men"; our words and our appeals ought not to be taken seriously by straight guys because of our sexuality.

2. We're straight, but our pro-feminism is a guise for "getting chicks"; we're really just horny guys who have devised a slick and cynical strategy for sexual conquest. Thus, we ought not to be taken seriously.

3. We're not gay, and we're not sexual predators -- but we're somehow still so fundamentally atypical that our exhortations to other men carry no weight. This is what Mr. Bad presumably means when he says that I am "plumbed like a guy, but act(s) like a girl."

via Hugo Schwyzer - Plumbed Like A Guy, Acts Like A Girl

Posted by Russell at 09:47 AM | Comments (0)

February 22, 2006

Ten Years in a Men's Group

To some, the idea of men's groups has gone the way of drumming circles - something that was popular during the Robert Bly years of the men's movement, but is now a "quaint" idea. The two articles below point to the inherent power that a simply-formatted men's group can have.

via Voice Male - Going to the Group: Ten Years Later
via Voice Male - The Revolutionary Act of Sitting in a Support Group

Posted by Russell at 09:43 AM | Comments (0)




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