The Uncommon Man

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December 30, 2008

Study finds black teen killing rate up

***This articles serves as a reminder of why engaging men in violence prevention is relevant and it is important to note, as it is illustrates in the article, that this is an issue of young Black men killing other young Black men.***

Black teenagers are killing each other in rising numbers as part of a troubling trend that has been masked by a falling crime rate in the United States, according to a new study released today by Northeastern University.

FBI crime statistics show overall decreases in violent crime and murder. But amid those numbers, the report by criminal justice professors James Alan Fox and Marc Swatt found other disturbing trends.

Among their findings: an increase of more than 39 percent in the number of black males between ages 14-17 killed between 2000 and 2007 and an increase of 34 percent in the number of blacks that age who committed homicide.

The increases for white male teens, meanwhile, were nearly 17 percent and 3 percent, respectively.

“We can’t ignore that hidden in the overall good news is very bad news for a segment of the population, young black males, and they need our attention,” Fox said.

Fox calls for an infusion of government money to beef up police forces and restore mentor, sports, after-school and summer programs that withered as federal funds were redirected from cities to homeland security after the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

“We need to invest much more in the lives of these kids,” Fox said. “I know there’s lot of people who say times are tough and we don’t have the money, but we either pay for these programs now or pray for these victims later because crime doesn’t wait until the economy improves.”

Fox emphasizes that despite problems highlighted in his report, crime isn’t out of control.

The report indicates guns are overwhelmingly the weapon of choice for young black offenders and are now used in nearly 85 percent of all homicides they commit, matching 1990s levels. The Rev. Jeffrey Brown, executive director of the anti-crime Ten Point Coalition in Boston, said the spike in gun murders by and on young blacks “bears out what I see on the streets every day.”

“The victim and perpetrators of gun crimes are getting younger and younger,” he said.


By Associated Press | Monday, December 29, 2008 | http://www.bostonherald.com | Local Coverage
Article URL: http://www.bostonherald.com/news/regional/view.bg?articleid=1141747

Posted by Aaron Buford at 01:43 PM | Comments (0)

December 22, 2008

Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India: Proving What Works in Engaging Men

It is obvious that engaging men is vital to ending violence against women. But what works best to get them involved? What persuades them to change their attitudes? Will they change their actual behaviours? Providing answers to these questions would be invaluable to the growing number of anti-violence initiatives for men that are springing up around the world. A UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women project involving organizations in Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India is setting out to do just that.

“There is an impressive body of experiences in working with men, but also uneven evidence on and some skepticism about what the impacts actually are,” says Christine Ricardo at Brazil-based Instituto Promundo, the project’s lead organization. “Our hope is to contribute to the global evidence base on what can be done by developing evaluation models to guide future programming and advocacy.”

In each country, project partners will carry out rigorous impact evaluation studies of group workshops and campaigns targeting men between the ages of 15 and 40 in low-income communities. The workshops will engage up to 3,000 participants; the campaigns are expected to reach an additional 20,000 men. Each intervention will be tailored to the individual country, and designed to explore issues such as traditional notions of masculinity, promote alternatives to violence, and encourage positive changes in attitudes and behaviours. One particular model that the project will draw on is Program H, a Promundo initiative to involve men in supporting gender equality that has been successfully rolled out in 20 countries in Asia, Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

Through follow-up surveys that tap both men and their partners, immediately and over time, the project will scrutinize actual changes in attitudes and behaviors, and the factors that foster or hinder these. Project partners are aiming for increases in positive attitudes and behaviours among men, decreases in the self-reported use of violence and greater awareness of the importance of engaging men. Lessons learned will be disseminated through the MenEngage Alliance, a global network of more than 400 organizations.

Each of the participating countries has a demonstrated commitment to working to end violence against women. Brazil and India, in particular, exert the kind of regional influence that could encourage neighbouring countries to pick up on project results. Chile and Rwanda are expected to further develop existing capacities to work with men and conduct evaluations, with a particular emphasis on post-conflict needs in Rwanda.

Ricardo stresses that across the project, there will be attempts to differentiate what is universal, and what needs to be culturally specific. She adds, “the backing of the UN Trust Fund is very powerful in getting the results out and recognized. It has so much credibility, and offers so many possibilities for exchange and collaborative learning.”

Instituto Promundo, Brazil, received a grant in 2008 from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women for the 3-year project titled “Engaging Men to End Gender-Based Violence: A Multi-Country Intervention and Impact Evaluation Study,” which it is conducting in partnership with CulturaSalud/EME (Chile), the International Center for Research on Women (United States and India), Men’s Resources International (United States), the Rwanda Men’s Resource Centre and Rwanda MenEngage Network (Rwanda), and Sahayog (India). For more information, please contact UN Trust Fund staff.

Posted by Aaron Buford at 03:06 PM | Comments (0)

Men Can Stop Rape Conference: Men and Women as Allies

Men Can Stop Rape, Inc. is pleased to invite you to join us at our conference, "Men and Women as Allies: National Conference on Primary Prevention of Violence Against Women."

For more information, visit:
http://mencanstoprape.org/conference/

This conference will take place this April 14-15, 2009 at the deluxe Hyatt Regency Washington on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

As we enter a time of change, it is an opportune moment to engage the new administration. You will hear keynotes from new appointees and participate in federal briefings.

We also believe it is time for a new conversation about prevention of violence against women based on some tough, hard questions. What are women's and men's roles in primary prevention? How can domestic violence, sexual assault, and men's anti-violence groups work together to advance prevention?

We will meet these and other challenging questions head on, seeking informed and constructive answers.

Your participation will help to create a conference climate that is inspirational, motivational, and collaborative.

We look forward to seeing you in April!

Sincerely,

Stephen Glaude
President and CEO

http://mencanstoprape.org/conference/

Posted by Daniel at 02:04 PM | Comments (0)

Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India: Proving What Works in Engaging Men

It is obvious that engaging men is vital to ending violence against women. But what works best to get them involved? What persuades them to change their attitudes? Will they change their actual behaviours? Providing answers to these questions would be invaluable to the growing number of anti-violence initiatives for men that are springing up around the world. A UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women project involving organizations in Brazil, Chile, Rwanda and India is setting out to do just that.

“There is an impressive body of experiences in working with men, but also uneven evidence on and some skepticism about what the impacts actually are,” says Christine Ricardo at Brazil-based Instituto Promundo, the project’s lead organization. “Our hope is to contribute to the global evidence base on what can be done by developing evaluation models to guide future programming and advocacy.”

In each country, project partners will carry out rigorous impact evaluation studies of group workshops and campaigns targeting men between the ages of 15 and 40 in low-income communities. The workshops will engage up to 3,000 participants; the campaigns are expected to reach an additional 20,000 men. Each intervention will be tailored to the individual country, and designed to explore issues such as traditional notions of masculinity, promote alternatives to violence, and encourage positive changes in attitudes and behaviours. One particular model that the project will draw on is Program H, a Promundo initiative to involve men in supporting gender equality that has been successfully rolled out in 20 countries in Asia, Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

Through follow-up surveys that tap both men and their partners, immediately and over time, the project will scrutinize actual changes in attitudes and behaviors, and the factors that foster or hinder these. Project partners are aiming for increases in positive attitudes and behaviours among men, decreases in the self-reported use of violence and greater awareness of the importance of engaging men. Lessons learned will be disseminated through the MenEngage Alliance, a global network of more than 400 organizations.

Each of the participating countries has a demonstrated commitment to working to end violence against women. Brazil and India, in particular, exert the kind of regional influence that could encourage neighbouring countries to pick up on project results. Chile and Rwanda are expected to further develop existing capacities to work with men and conduct evaluations, with a particular emphasis on post-conflict needs in Rwanda.

Ricardo stresses that across the project, there will be attempts to differentiate what is universal, and what needs to be culturally specific. She adds, “the backing of the UN Trust Fund is very powerful in getting the results out and recognized. It has so much credibility, and offers so many possibilities for exchange and collaborative learning.”

Instituto Promundo, Brazil, received a grant in 2008 from the UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women for the 3-year project titled “Engaging Men to End Gender-Based Violence: A Multi-Country Intervention and Impact Evaluation Study,” which it is conducting in partnership with CulturaSalud/EME (Chile), the International Center for Research on Women (United States and India), Men’s Resources International (United States), the Rwanda Men’s Resource Centre and Rwanda MenEngage Network (Rwanda), and Sahayog (India). For more information, please contact UN Trust Fund staff.

Posted by Aaron Buford at 01:28 PM | Comments (0)

December 10, 2008

Springfield Roundtable

Connecting Advocates of Family Violence Prevention and Positive Masculinity

Co-hosted by Men's Resources International and the Engaging Men Practicum Group

Overall Goal:
To increase the involvement of men as allies with women in preventing family violence, and as positive role models for children.

Roundtable Objectives:

  • To assemble a group of Springfield-based professionals and volunteers directly involved with family violence prevention and/or positive masculinity as it relates to healthy relationships and families.
  • To identify common values and share areas of experience and expertise with each other.
  • To identify potential opportunities for collaboration and collective action.
  • To discuss visions for a Springfield-based network for engaging men and boys as allies with women in violence prevention and healthy families.

  • Attendance:
    Over 30 people attended the event representing a rich diversity of organizations, experience and expertise. All shared a commitment to working with Springfield men, women and youth to create healthier relationships, families and communities. The discussion was animated and exciting, with participants expressing enthusiasm and optimism about the possibility for collective action. Several ideas for next steps were proposed and communication and planning among group members is ongoing.

    Posted by Daniel at 05:02 PM | Comments (0)

    December 03, 2008

    New web site highlights what works to prevent violence

    image002.jpg

    WHO and Liverpool John Moores University's Centre for Public Health have launched today an important new web site highlighting what works to prevent violence. Geared towards policy-makers and violence prevention researchers, practitioners and advocates, the web site marks the first time that information on effective violence prevention programmes is available in a searchable web-based data base.

    Violence is responsible for 1.6 million deaths every year of which half are suicides, a third homicides, and a tenth due to war and other forms of collective violence. Millions more people are injured and psychologically scarred by violence each year, often with life-long consequences. Violence costs economies billions of dollars annually in direct health, legal, and welfare costs and indirect costs due to lost productivity. This seriously impedes the development of low-income and middle-income countries.

    Violence can be prevented and its impact reduced by adopting an evidence-based public health approach. Such an approach seeks to prevent violence before it occurs, by reducing the factors that place people at risk and reinforcing those which protect them. The new website includes:

    *A searchable data base of abstracts from published studies that measure the effectiveness of interventions to prevent violence. The abstracts can be searched by violence type (child abuse, elder abuse, intimate partner violence, youth violence, sexual violence), keywords, and geographical area of implementation.
    *Resources including key publications on violence and its prevention;
    *Information and links to relevant organizations, including the Violence Prevention Alliance (VPA), a WHO-led network of agencies dedicated to preventing violence using the public health approach;
    *News including updates on new violence prevention events and publications;
    *An opportunity for organizations to contribute to the web site by submitting resources.

    The Violence Prevention web site can be accessed at: http://www.nwph.net/preventviolence/default.aspx

    For further information, please contact Dr Christopher Mikton at miktonc@who.int

    RELATED LINKS
    WHO violence prevention:
    http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/en/

    Violence Prevention Alliance:
    http://www.who.int/violenceprevention/en/index.html

    Global Campaign for Violence Prevention:
    http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/global_campaign/en/index.html

    Posted by Aaron Buford at 01:36 PM | Comments (0)




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